Burst the Bubble on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women

Throughout the world, Canada is considered an inclusive and liberal country that is welcoming to all people. But when you look closer at the history of Canada in terms of its native people, you can see that there are dark truths that lie within.

In the news and online, you might have heard about the struggle of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women. But, do you understand the facts about this issue and what is- and isn't- being done to stop this horrifying trend?

Find out how much you know with this informative quiz.
Begin Your Journey
The number of murdered Aboriginal women and girls is proportionate to non-Aboriginal women in Canada.
NWAC’s research indicates that, Aboriginal women and girls represented approximately 10% of all female homicides in Canada. However, Aboriginal women make up only 3% of the female population.

Since 1991, the number of murdered non-Indigenous women has declined. In contrast, the number of murdered Indigenous women has remained relatively stable, thus accounting for an increasing proportion of Indigenous female homicide victims.
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Aboriginal women and girls are 3 times more likely to report having been the victim of a violent crime than non-Aboriginal women.
The Canadian Department of Justice reports that Aboriginal females are more than three times as likely to become victims of violent crimes than any other segment of society. Indigenous women are four times as likely to be murdered than their non-Native counterparts. Over 800 Native women have simply disappeared or been found murdered since the year 1990, and the epidemic shows no signs of slowing down.
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The majority of violent crimes against aboriginal women happen in remote areas.

The majority of cases occurred in urban areas, 70% of the women and girls disappeared from an urban area and 60% were found murdered in an urban area. Only a small number of cases occurred on-reserve (7% of missing cases and 13% of murder cases).

While the majority of cases occurred in urban areas, this violence often has a direct impact on rural or reserve communities. Most Aboriginal peoples living in urban areas maintain close ties to their home communities. The shock and grief of a missing or murdered community member impacts the entire community, no matter where the violence takes place.

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The majority of women at risk are under the age of 30.

Most of the cases involve young women and girls. Just over half of the cases (55%) involve women and girls under the age of 30, with 17% of women and girls 18 years of age or younger. Only 8% of cases involve women over 45.

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We know most of the facts about the majority of these cases.

Nearly half of murder cases in NWAC’s database remain unsolved. NWAC has found that only 53% of murder cases involving Aboriginal women and girls have led to charges of homicide. This is dramatically different from the national clearance rate for homicides in Canada, which was last reported as 84%. While a small number of cases in NWAC’s database have been “cleared” by the suicide of the offender or charges other than homicide, 40% of murder cases remain unsolved.

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You got {number correct}/{number of questions} correct answers

Thanks for taking time to learn about this topic. If there were more people like you who were curious and wanted to learn about the issues around them our world would be a kinder place.

To keep update on this topic visit:

The Disappearance of Delaine Copenace - the 16 year old aboriginal girl who went missing and was found dead in Lake of the Woods in 2016. We speak with her mother Anita Ross, who is still trying to make sense of her daughter’s death.
Listen to Delaine’s story >

Missing and Murdered Native Women: The Delaine Copenace Story -
The young aboriginal woman is one of thousands of missing and murdered indigenous women who have never found justice. Read the full article >

Killed In RECORD Numbers: Why Indigenous Women Are Victims Of ASTONISHING Violence: Indigenous women are four times as likely to be murdered than their non-Native counterparts. Read the full article >
You got {number correct}/{number of questions} correct answers

Thanks for taking time to learn about this topic. If there were more people like you who were curious and wanted to learn about the issues around them our world would be a kinder place.

To keep update on this topic visit:

The Disappearance of Delaine Copenace - the 16 year old aboriginal girl who went missing and was found dead in Lake of the Woods in 2016. We speak with her mother Anita Ross, who is still trying to make sense of her daughter’s death.
Listen to Delaine’s story >

Missing and Murdered Native Women: The Delaine Copenace Story -
The young aboriginal woman is one of thousands of missing and murdered indigenous women who have never found justice. Read the full article >

Killed In RECORD Numbers: Why Indigenous Women Are Victims Of ASTONISHING Violence: Indigenous women are four times as likely to be murdered than their non-Native counterparts. Read the full article >